"Above And Beyond The Call Of Duty"
Seaman Dorie Miller was one of the first heroes of WW-II, at Pearl Harbor, December 7, and was awarded the Navy Cross for bravery under fire by Admiral Chester Nimitz. "On The Same Team" The WAVES went from being an auxiliary to performing important roles in WW-II, but not on combat ships.  Many WAVES had important jobs in communications and the interception of enemy radio transmissions. "Navy Day, October 27th" This classic pre-war Navy Day poster features battleships, submarines and vast squadrons of carrier aircraft. "Avenge December 7" This very powerful poster features the ghost of a sailor rising with the oily smoke from the U.S. Navy Pacific fleet ships sunk at Pearl Harbor. Over 2000 sailors were killed or remained entombed inside ships like the USS Arizona. "A Careless Word…A Needless Loss" The continuing message of WW-II was to remind everyone to keep quiet about ship movements and telling friends about where and what ship their buddies or relatives were on. "Fire Away!" This dramatic Victory War Loan poster depicts a night engagement by a U.S. sub. Night attacks were highly   successful on Japanese cargo ships that often did not travel in convoys. Once torpedoed, a deck gun finished the task. "Sub Spotted- Let 'Em Have It!" This Navy poster appeals not to patriotism but to action and adventure, if you join up. The sailors here are winching high explosive depth charges, which are then launched overboard to try and sink submarines. Attention! (enlistment in the U.S. Navy) A classic mid-1930's view of either the Lexington or  Saratoga with a Boeing F4B taking off. These two carriers operated in the Pacific and in the dark, early days of WW-II they were America's only real defense against Japan's navy. "Man The Guns" Here's a classic early WW-II poster which appeals to action and adventure. In this case  sailors are loading and firing heavy deck guns in an engagement with the enemy. "Hit 'Em Where It Hurts!" The dramatic scene of a sinking Japanese aircraft  carrier (the black arrow points to the sub's periscope) was something U.S. subs really did. What they also did was sink massive amounts of cargo ships which strangled Japan. "YOU Can't Afford To Miss  EITHER!" This poster was directed at the home front to sell War Bonds. It depicts a Navy 50 Cal. Gunner in the back of a patrol bomber downing a Japanese Zero. "Victory Begins At Home!" A message from Admiral Ernest King asking Americans to remain at their battle stations (production jobs). The sinking of Japanese aircraft carriers was something the Navy did especially well at the Battle of Midway. "Every Mothers Son Is Counting On You! Another way of saying- "keep going" to the home front audience. This poster is a  collection of photos, including even two black sailors with white crewmen- an indication that the war was already breaking down racial barriers. "See Action Now" This classic poster could not be more direct. The appeal is    action and adventure, this time for the Submarine Service, which badly needed recruits, as it was a very dangerous job. Subs sometimes shot it out on the surface and delivered  advanced commando teams. "Your Navy-First Line Of    Attack" A Navy F4F Wildcat on the carrier deck gets a take-off  signal. Carrier decks required great care as they were very dangerous places at all times. Armed Forces Day has since replaced Navy Day." Join The Navy" The Service For Fighting Men. It is likely this pre-war era poster was directed to  Southern and Mid-Western states in the U.S., were the Navy had always been very successful. Bronco-riding torpedoes was great fiction. "Couldn't Have Done It    Without You!" A crewman paints another  Japanese flag on the side of their deck guns, which appear to be the 16 inch type found on battleships. The message was for the home front production workers, which was "Full Speed Ahead". "If You Tell Where's He's   Going… He May Never Get There!" A very handsome sailor with his sea bag. It's an updated version of the original classic: "Loose Lips Sink Ships" This poster has been since used in cigarette advertisements in various alterations. "He Volunteered For Submarine Service" Obviously this sailor's girl likes his submarine badge.  Being on a sub got a crewman extra pay, like a bomber crew, so these guys were very  popular. Submarine chow was also supposed to be the best in the Navy. "Cadets For Naval Aviation" Being a Navy carrier pilot required a wide range of skills, not just flying, but seamanship as well as officer training. Like landing on rolling decks? Training accidents alone took a large toll in WW-II. "Learn To Operate A$7,000,000 Sub" Subs cost in the Billions today but they still require sailors to man dials, switches and levers. In WW-II it was the 1940's version of "high tech" as well as being extra dangerous to be a submarine crewman. "Your Fleet Guarantees Freedom" This 1944 Navy Day poster features a variety of Navy aircraft and sea craft circling the globe. And by October 1944 it was clear the U.S. was winning the war with its massive Navy.

RARE CLASSIC WORLD WAR II POSTERS. U. S. ARMY. U.S. NAVY. U.S. ARMY AIR CORPS. U.S. MARINE CORPS.
ROSIE THE RIVITER. UNCLE SAM. BATTLESHIP "MIGHTY MO". FIGHTER PLANES. BOMBERS. SOLDIERS. THE PACIFIC WAR. PEARL HARBOR. JAPANESE SURRENDER, TOKYO BAY, 1945.

RARE VINTAGE HAWAII POSTERS.   MATSON MENUS.  PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS CLIPPER POSTERS. THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN HOTEL. OUTRIGGER CANOES. ALOHA TOWER "BOAT DAY" POSTERS.  SURFING POSTERS.
DUKE KAHANAMOKU POSTERS. MUSIC POSTERS. HULA GIRLS. SURF GIRLS.